Samples

Here we are showing how highly variable the quality of the images that we salvage from peoples film can be.  It will help us to communicate what we mean when we might say “The film that you have trends fair in terms of quality” or if you look at our film results chart here, our ratings will have some decent context.  While we don’t have movie film samples here, the samples will still provide some context for you.

Thanks so much to our clients that let us use their images here.

VERY GOOD – Virtually like new film.

Generally by the time people find us with their expired film there is at least some deterioration to the negative but there are always surprises.  Newer film where such results can be expected we refer our clients to other reputable providers.  Here’s a list of some film that sometime turn out “very good”.

  • Films less than 15 years old stored in cool conditions
  •  Any Kodak brand B&W film newer than 40 years old
  •  Kodak Verichrome Pan
  •  Kodak Tri-X
  •  Kodak Plus-X
  •  Kodachrome 64
    

 

GOOD – Some signs of age deterioration.

It is not entirely uncommon to get good results from long expired film.  The cooler your film was stored the more likely it is to come out “GOOD”.  Here’s a list of some film that often turn out “good”.

  • Films less than 15 years old stored in cool conditions
  • Any Kodak brand B&W film newer than 50 years old
  • Kodak Verichrome Pan
  • Kodak Tri-X
  • Kodak Plus-X
  • Kodak Kodacolor-X
  • Kodachrome 64
  • Kodachrome 40
     
     

FAIR – Fully recognizable but with obvious age deterioration.  Edge fogging, mottling and graininess is normal.

Most of the vintage film that we process is 20 to 60 years old and “FAIR” results are most common.  The images though deteriorated are by most clientele considered desirable none the less.  In some cases the deterioration even adds a certain charm to the pictures.  Here’s a list of some film that often turn out “fair”.

  • Kodacolor-X (roll or cassette)
  • Kodacolor II (roll or cassette)
  • Kodachrome II
  • Kodachrome-X
  • Kodachrome 40 & 64
  • Ansco Allweather
  • Ektachrome E-4 process film
  • Triple Print V
  • Triple Print VI
  • Kodak Disc Film Generations 1, 5, 7, 8
  • 3M or Scotch brand (all formats)
  • Kodak Verichrome (not pan)
  • Kodack Verichrome Pan
  • Triple Print 126 pink label
  • Triple Print 126 green label
  • Agfa Plenachrome
  • Agfa Ultrachrome

                         

POOR – Film is significantly deteriorated by age.  Fully recognizable and often desirable images.  Mottling, edge fogging, spider webbing, extreme graininess are normal.

Though not as common as “FAIR” results we do get a lot of film that falls into this category.  These poor quality images can still be very valuable to our clientele, revealing new glimpses of times long past. Here’s a list of some film that it is not uncommon to turn out “poor”.

  • Kodacolor-X cassettes (126, 35mm)
  • Kodacolor II cassettes (126, 35mm, 110)
  • Kodak Disc Film generations 1 to 7 (6 is the worst)
  • Kodak Ektachrome E-2 and E-4 process film
  • Kodachrome greater than 50 years old (no suffix such as an x,II,40 or 64)
  • Triple Print green label
  • Triple Print black label
  • B&W film greater than 60 years old
  • Color film greater than 20 years old process by client request into color
  • Fuji Brand films greater than 30 years old

                    

VERY POOR – Unless you inspect the negatives very closely they will appear blank.  Mottling, edge fogging, spider webbing, extreme graininess are normal.

We don’t like these and do our best to avoid having film turn out this way but it does happen – fortunately it is not at all the norm.  Believe it or not, much of our clientele are interested enough in these pictures that they still order them from their on-line previews.  We are sometimes criticized for charging when film comes out like this but please remember that they do possibly represent the last new glimpse a person will have of a long lost loved one.  Often times we are not aware of the content or of the possible end image quality until we scan the negative and put it through Photoshop.  It is more difficult to scan these horrible negatives and we can’t be left in a position to decide what may or may not be important to a person – these will still be charged for. Here’s a list of some film that it is not uncommon to turn out ” very poor” if at all.

  • GAF brand film in a cassette (126, 35mm) with a purple label
  • Kodachrome greater than 50 years old (no suffix such as an x,II,40 or 64)
  • Triple Print blue label
  • Kodak Disc film Generation 6
  • Fuji Disc Generation 1
  • Any film that has been stored for a long period of time in hot conditions (attics, storage sheds, cars)